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Brain Tumors

Meningiomas

A meningioma is a growth of the meninges or the lining of the brain. Most, but not all of the time, this growth is “benign” meaning that it mainly causes problems by pressing on nearby structures and typically does not spread to other parts of the brain or body. The treatment of a meningioma typically consists of surveillance imaging (that is repeating an MRI at a later time), stereotactic radiosurgery, or microsurgical removal (most commonly via a craniotomy). Some important factors to consider with regard to meningiomas are: location, size, associated swelling, and growth rate.

Read more about Meningiomas on the AANS website.

Primary brain tumors/Gliomas

The pituitary gland is located underneath the brain (in an area know as the sella turcica) and can give rise to tumors. The most common tumors are called pituitary adenomas. Most commonly these tumors cause symptoms by pushing on important nearby structures, for examples the nerves that transmit visual information. Other times these tumors secrete too much of one of the pituitary hormones; an example of this are tumors that secrete growth hormone and cause acromegaly. When treatment is necessary, it is most commonly performed via the nose. Other times, these tumors may be treated with medication or stereotactic radiosurgery. Finally, other types of growths or tumors may be located near the pituitary gland, for example, craniopharyngiomas or Rathke’s cleft cysts.

Read more about primary brain tumors/gliomas on the AANS website.

Metastatic brain tumors

A metastatic brain tumor is a tumor of the brain that originated from elsewhere in the body. The most commonly primary tumor sites associated with brain metastatic tumors are the lung and breast, although there are many sites where the tumor may come from. In general, it is important to determine the site of origin before treating the metastatic brain tumor. Treatment often entails stereotactic radiosurgery, microsurgical resection, and/or chemotherapy. The decision on exactly how to treat each tumor is made on a individual basis; there are many important factors that guide treatment. A few of these factors are the type of tumor (for example, originating from the lung), the location, the size, and the state of tumors in other parts of the body.

Read more about metastatic brain tumors on the AANS website.

Pituitary/sellar tumors

The pituitary gland is located underneath the brain (in an area know as the sella turcica) and can give rise to tumors. The most common tumors are called pituitary adenomas. Most commonly these tumors cause symptoms by pushing on important nearby structures, for examples the nerves that transmit visual information. Other times these tumors secrete too much of one of the pituitary hormones; an example of this are tumors that secrete growth hormone and cause acromegaly. When treatment is necessary, it is most commonly performed via the nose. Other times, these tumors may be treated with medication or stereotactic radiosurgery. Finally, other types of growths or tumors may be located near the pituitary gland, for example, craniopharyngiomas or Rathke’s cleft cysts.

Read more about Pituitary/Sellar tumors on the AANS website.