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Vascular Conditions

Trigeminal neuralgia/facial pain

Patients with trigeminal neuralgia have intense, unbearable pain along an aspect of the face. The pain commonly comes on very quickly and is electric-like in nature. It may be triggered various factors for example, eating and chewing. This condition can often be controlled with medicines (managed by a neurologist or primary care doctor). However, when the pain is not controlled by medication, microvascular decompression surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery stereotactic radiosurgery may provide patients with long-lasting relief of this disabling symptom.

Read more about Trigeminal neuralgia/facial pain on the AANS website.

Cerebral aneurysms

When a blood vessel in the brain develops a weakness in its wall and leads to a ballooning or outpouching, we refer to this a cerebral aneurysm. Simply the presence of a cerebral aneurysm generally does not cause a problem, however, when a cerebral aneurysm ruptures it typically causes a form of stroke call subarachnoid hemorrhage. This type of stroke is very serious and can lead to severe disability or death. The location and size of cerebral aneurysms provides information as to how likely they are to rupture. The treatment of cerebral aneurysms is performed one of two ways: microsurgery or via endovascular methods. Microsurgery entails placing a clip across the aneurysm wall to prevent it from rupturing. There are many forms of endovascular (access through blood vessels) treatment, the most common being placement of metal coils in to the aneurysm to prevent it from rupturing. Commonly, aneurysm treatment includes a neurosurgeon and an interventional radiologist.

Read more about Cerebral aneurysms on the AANS website.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage

Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a type of stroke that occurs when a brain aneurysm ruptures, causing blood to leak out from affected blood vessel. This is a very serious condition that can lead to severe disability and death. Following aneurysm rupture a patient typically undergoes treatment to prevent the same aneurysm from leaking more blood. This treatment is performed one of two ways: microsurgery or via endovascular methods. Microsurgery entails placing a clip across the aneurysm wall to prevent it from rupturing. There are many forms of endovascular (access through blood vessels) treatment, the most common being placement of metal coils in to the aneurysm to prevent it from rupturing. Commonly, aneurysm treatment includes a neurosurgeon, an interventional radiologist, and a neurointensivist.

Read more about Subarachnoid hemorrhage on the AANS website.

Arterio-venous malformations

Arterio-venous malformations (AVMs) are abnormal formations of blood vessels in the brain or spine. AVMs can cause serous injury via strokes, hemorrhages (bleeding events), and seizures. Microsurgery, radiosurgery/stereotactic radiation, and endovascular embolization are all used to treat of AVMs. The treatment plan for each patient depends on a number of factors including the size, location, source/exit of blood flow to an AVM, and if it has ruptured/bled in the past.

Read more about Arterio-venous malformations on the AANS website.

Cavernous malformations

Cavernous malformations are abnormal growths of blood vessels, within which there is slow flow of blood. These can occur in the brain as well as elsewhere in the body. When in the brain they can cause symptoms/injury via hemorrhages (bleeding events) and seizures. The treatment of cavernous malformations depends on several factors including size, location, and if it has ruptured/bled in the past. When necessary, treatment typically involves microsurgical removal.

Read more about Cavernous malformations on the AANS website.